Wetware: A Computer in Every Living Cell

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Yale University Press #ad - Cells are built out of molecular circuits that perform logical operations, as electronic devices do, but with unique properties. In clear, jargon-free language, dennis Bray taps the findings from the discipline of systems biology to show that the internal chemistry of living cells is a form of computation.

For the general reader, and all others with an interest in the nature of life, the practicing scientist, this book is an exciting portal to some of biology’s latest discoveries and ideas. A beautifully written journey into the mechanics of the world of the cell, and even beyond, exploring the analogy with computers in a surprising way” Denis Noble, author of Dance to the Tune of Life.

Drawing on the similarities between Pac-Man and an amoeba and efforts to model the human brain, this absorbing read shows that biologists and engineers have a lot to learn from working together. Discover magazine   “Wetware will get the reader thinking. Science magazine. Bray argues that the computational juice of cells provides the basis for all distinctive properties of living systems: it allows organisms to embody in their internal structure an image of the world, and this accounts for their adaptability, responsiveness, and intelligence.

Wetware: A Computer in Every Living Cell #ad - How does a single-cell creature, and smells, lead such a sophisticated life? How does it hunt living prey, respond to lights, sounds, such as an amoeba, and display complex sequences of movements without the benefit of a nervous system? This book offers a startling and original answer. In wetware, and perceptive critiques of robotics and complexity theory, wide-ranging, Bray offers imaginative, as well as many entertaining and telling anecdotes.

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Farewell to Reality: How Modern Physics Has Betrayed the Search for Scientific Truth

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Pegasus Books #ad -  . Where does one draw the line between solid science and fairy-tale physics? Jim Baggott argues that there is no observational or experimental evidence for many of the ideas of modern theoretical physics: super-symmetric particles, the holographic principle, the multiverse, super strings, or the anthropic cosmological principle.

Informed, comprehensive, farewell to reality discusses the latest ideas about the nature of physical reality while clearly distinguishing between fact and fantasy, and balanced, providing essential and entertaining reading for everyone interested in what we know and don’t know about the nature of the universe and reality itself.

Farewell to Reality: How Modern Physics Has Betrayed the Search for Scientific Truth #ad - From acclaimed science author jim Baggot, a lively, provocative, and “intellectually gratifying” critique of modern theoretical physics The Economist. Barrow, brian Greene, and Leonard Susskind. Unafraid to challenge prominent theorists, including Stephen Hawking, Paul Davies, 
Baggott offers engaging portraits of many central figures of modern physics, John D.

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Here on Earth: A Natural History of the Planet

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Grove Press #ad - From the internationally acclaimed scientist, explorer, and conservationist comes an awe-inspiring account of earth’s evolution. In a compelling narrative, copper, as well as the transformation of the planet’s oceans from toxic brews of metals such as iron, Flannery describes the formation of the Earth’s crust and atmosphere, and lead to life-sustaining bodies covering seventy percent of the planet’s surface.

Drawing on charles darwin’s and alfred russel Wallace’s theories of evolution and Lovelock’s Gaia hypothesis, Here on Earth is a dazzling account of life on our planet. From this starting point, flannery tells the fascinating story of the evolution of our own species, exploring several early human species—from the diminutive creatures the famed hobbits who lived in Africa around two million years ago to Homo erectus—before turning his attention to Homo sapiens.

Here on Earth: A Natural History of the Planet #ad - Beginning at the moment of creation with the big bang, Here on Earth explores the evolution of Earth from a galactic cloud of dust and gas to a planet with a metallic core and early signs of life within a billion years of being created. Life, flannery shows, first appeared in these oceans in the form of microscopic plants and bacteria, and these metals served as catalysts for the earliest biological processes known to exist.

You’ll discover why tim Flannery’s books have made him the rock star of modern science. Jared diamond, pulitzer Prize–winning author of Guns, Germs, and Steel.

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The Goldilocks Enigma: Why Is the Universe Just Right for Life?

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Mariner Books #ad - Here he tackles all the “big questions, from the properties of the humble carbon atom to the speed of light, ” including the biggest of them all: Why does the universe seem so well adapted for life?   In his characteristically clear and elegant style, Davies shows how recent scientific discoveries point to a perplexing fact: many different aspects of the cosmos, seem tailor-made to produce life.

Whether he’s elucidating dark matter or dark energy, Davies brings the leading edge of science into sharp focus, M-theory or the multiverse, provoking us to think about the cosmos and our place within it in new and thrilling ways. An acclaimed physicist and cosmologist considers the multiverse and more: “Very readable indeed .

The Goldilocks Enigma: Why Is the Universe Just Right for Life? #ad -  .  . This is doctor Who, but for real. Theguardianthe goldilocks enigma is Paul Davies’s eagerly awaited return to cosmology, the successor to his critically acclaimed bestseller The Mind of God. Our universe is bio-friendly by accident—we just happened to win the cosmic jackpot. While this “multiverse” theory is compelling, it has bizarre implications, such as the existence of infinite copies of each of us and Matrix-like simulated universes.

If this is true, ultimately, consciousness—aren’t just incidental byproducts of nature, then life—and, but central players in the evolution of the universe. And it still leaves a lot unexplained.

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Nuclear Physics

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Philosophical Library/Open Road #ad - A central figure in the development of the atomic bomb and a close colleague of Albert Einstein, Heisenberg wrote Nuclear Physics “for readers who, while interested in natural sciences, have no previous training in theoretical physics. Compiled from a series of his lectures on the subject, the tools of nuclear physics, Heisenberg begins with a short history of atomic physics before delving into the nature of nuclear forces and reactions, and its world-changing technical and practical applications.

Nuclear Physics #ad - Theoretical physicist werner Heisenberg is famous for developing the uncertainty principle, which bears his name, and for his pioneering work in quantum mechanics. Nuclear physics is an ideal book for general readers interested in learning about some of the most significant scientific breakthroughs of the twentieth century.

 . The nobel prize–winning physicist offers a fascinating popular introduction to nuclear physics from early atomic theory to its transformative applications.

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Cook's Encyclopaedia

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Grub Street Cookery #ad - Tom stobart traveled widely, both as an explorer and a filmmaker, and his book was informed by an eye for telling details. Stobart describes how baking powder works, for instance, and how to make your own tomato ketchup, so every time you dip into this book, the temperature at which bacteria grow, you’ll be better equipped to return to the stove.

The aim is to both entertain and to instruct—in particular, to give a sense of the essence and individuality of each ingredient. Arranged alphabetically from Abalone to Zampone, Cook’s Encyclopedia covers the majority of foods and processes used in cooking. Many fans say they would be lost without this book, which segues effortlessly between exhaustive reference work and handy recipe book, and back again.

Cooking processes—including bottling, smoking, brewing, brining, curing, and vacuuming—are explained in great and illuminating detail. Hundreds of ingredients are described, with English and foreign synonyms and scientific names; recipes are given in many cases to illustrate the use of the foodstuff in question.

Cook's Encyclopaedia #ad - A must, comprehensive, well-organized and well-written.  .  . A descriptive compendium of just about everything we eat and how we cook it—selected as “one of the greatest cookbooks of all time” Waitrose Food Illustrated. It explains the world of the kitchen, revealing the facts behind foods, equipment, whether you’re a beginner or an old hand, and techniques.

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The Universe and the Teacup: The Mathematics of Truth and Beauty

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Mariner Books #ad - The universe and the teacup uses relatable examples, humorous prose, and whimsical line drawings to demonstrate math’s ability to “translate the complexity of the world into manageable patterns. Cole shows how mathematical concepts illuminate everything from human risk-taking behavior to astronomical investigation, game theory to logic problems—not to mention the very structure of the universe itself.

Brimming with trivia stressing the importance of math throughout history, this is a book both math nerds and the “innumerate” everyday person can enjoy in equal measure. Are the secrets of the universe written in words—or is it all about the digits? K. C. Cole follows up her paean to the power of physics, Sympathetic Vibrations, with this engaging and accessible guide to the might and majesty of mathematics.

The Universe and the Teacup: The Mathematics of Truth and Beauty #ad - Cole writes clearly, simply and vividly, ” noted The New York Times. She so obviously likes mathematics, the reader can't help liking it too. Filled with “a thousand fascinating facts and shrewd observations Martin Gardner, from relativity to rainbows, Los Angeles Times, this book demonstrates how the truth and beauty of everything, is all in the numbers.

 . From the acclaimed los angeles Times science writer, a wise, witty, and elegant study of how math provides practical solutions to everyday problems.

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Nothing: Surprising Insights Everywhere from Zero to Oblivion

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The Experiment #ad - And they discover that understanding nothing may be the key to understanding everything: what came before the big bang—and will our universe end?How might cooling matter down almost to absolute zero help solve our energy crisis?How can someone suffer from a false diagnosis as though it were true?Does nothingness even exist if squeezing a perfect vacuum somehow creates light?Why is it unfair to accuse sloths—animals who do nothing—of being lazy?And more! Contributors Paul Davies, along with two former editors of Nature and sixteen other leading writers and scientists, and Ian Stewart, Jo Marchant, marshal up-to-the-minute research to make one of the most perplexing realms in science dazzlingly clear.

Nothing: Surprising Insights Everywhere from Zero to Oblivion #ad - It turns out that nothing is as curious or as enlightening as nothingness itself. What is nothing? where can it be found? the writers of the world’s top-selling science magazine investigate—from the big bang, to superconductors, and the void, dark energy, vestigial organs, hypnosis, and the placebo effect.

Prepare to be amazed at how much more there is to nothing than you ever realized. The writers behind new scientist explore the baffling concept of nothingness from the fringes of the universe to our minds’ inner workings.

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Atom Land: A Guided Tour Through the Strange and Impossibly Small World of Particle Physics

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The Experiment #ad - Each discovery will expand the horizons of your trusty map—from the Hadron Island to the Isle of Quarks, and beyond. A masterful work of allegory, atom land also gives form to the forces that shape the universe: Electromagnetism is a highway system; the strong force, a railway; the weak force, an airline.

. But, toward the unknown realm of antimatter, you may find that curiosity is the strongest force of all—one that pulls you across the subatomic seas, like Butterworth, and to the very outer reaches of the cosmos. In atom land, he guides readers on a metaphorical journey through the quantum field and into an impossibly small world, setting sail from Port Electron in search of strange new terrain.

Atom Land: A Guided Tour Through the Strange and Impossibly Small World of Particle Physics #ad - An award-winning physicist “explains everything particle physics from antimatter to Z bosons in this charming trek through” the subatomic landscape Publisher Weekly. Award-winning physicist, professor, and author of Most Wanted Particle, Jon Butterworth is passionate about sharing the fascination of subatomic physics with the general public.

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Connectome: How the Brain's Wiring Makes Us Who We Are

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Mariner Books #ad - One of the wall street journal’s 10 best nonfiction books of the year and a Publishers Weekly “Top Ten in Science” Title   Every person is unique, but science has struggled to pinpoint where, precisely, that uniqueness resides. Connectome is a mind-bending adventure story offering a daring scientific and technological vision for understanding what makes us who we are, as individuals and as a species.

On par with cosmology’s brian Greene and the late Carl Sagan” The Plain Dealer. The question is: how?   Sebastian Seung is at the forefront of a revolution in neuroscience. But our friendships, failures, and passions also shape who we are. He believes that our identity lies not in our genes, but in the connections between our brain cells—our particular wiring.

Connectome: How the Brain's Wiring Makes Us Who We Are #ad - Seung and a dedicated group of researchers are leading the effort to map these connections, neuron by neuron, synapse by synapse. This is complicated stuff, and it is a testament to Dr. Accessible, witty .  .  . Seung is a clear, lively writer who chooses vivid examples. Thewashington Post.

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Lost in Wonder: Imagining Science and Other Mysteries

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Counterpoint #ad - Through serious and absurd stories alike, Brooks takes readers back and forth in time, from dark, cavernous laboratories to the pristine facilities of the twenty-first century. With brooks as the guide, it’s easy to become immersed in the twists, turns, and surprises of each imaginative leap forward.

Through a series of “thought experiments, Brooks also poses questions and offers helpful tips that ease the readers way into this strange but provocative territory. The splendors of science, delightfully demystified. How do we make sense of the modern world? Science is a profoundly affecting aspect of contemporary life, and yet the gulf between experts and everyone else is widening.

Lost in Wonder: Imagining Science and Other Mysteries #ad - Laugh along with newton, work beside the wright brothers, ride with the astronauts of Apollo 11, probe the secrets of the fruit fly, watch for UFOs in the 1950s, peer at the moon with Galileo, visit Chernobyl, or examine suspicious packages in a Hazmat suit. Colette brooks bridges the gap by playing the role of curious layperson, serving as a tour guide to some of the most important discoveries and innovations of the last five centuries.

Bringing her unique perspective to the larger cultural conversation about science, Brooks ultimately unleashes the most powerful force of all: our own wonder.

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